The European Institute of Cultural Roads (EICR) was established in 1998 following a political agreement between the Council of Europe and the Luxembourg government. Since then, the EICR has been responsible for the management of the Cultural Routes programme and has been linking route associations, its university network, the Council of Europe and, since 2010, the legislative bodies of the epa. This is why the Institute organizes several annual meetings between the program`s stakeholders, helps certify new cultural routes, evaluates certified routes every three years or promotes cultural itineraries. In December 2010, the Council of Europe`s Committee of Ministers adopted Resolution CM/Res (2010)53, which establishes, for an initial period of three years, an expanded partial agreement on cultural routes (EPA), confirmed in 2013 by resolution CM/Res (2013)66, in order to allow closer cooperation between states particularly interested in the development of cultural routes. The expanded cultural routes sub-agreement aims to strengthen the potential of cultural routes in terms of cultural cooperation, sustainable territorial development and social cohesion, with particular emphasis on themes of symbolic importance for European unity, history, culture and values and the discovery of lesser-known destinations. The EPA helps to strengthen the potential for cultural cooperation, sustainable territorial development and social cohesion, with a particular focus on symbolic themes for European unity, history, culture and values and the discovery of lesser-known destinations. It reinforces the democratic dimension of cultural exchanges and tourism through the participation of grassroots networks and associations, local and regional authorities, universities and professional associations. It contributes to the preservation of a diverse heritage through thematic and alternative tourist routes and cultural projects. The ERHG believes that recognition as a cultural route of the Council of Europe is the best way to recognise the historical, artistic and social value of historic gardens in the Member States, particularly in countries that have signed the expanded partial agreement on cultural routes. This is why the ERHG invites all the historic gardens of the Member States currently open for public visits, either for social culture or for sustainable tourism purposes, to join this network and its european cultural itinerary project called `European Historic Gardens`. The Expanded Sub-Agreement (CEPOL) contributes to the promotion of European identity and citizenship through knowledge and awareness of Europe`s common heritage, as well as to the development of cultural links and dialogue within Europe, as well as with other countries and regions. It aims to create a common cultural space by developing cultural pathways to promote awareness of cultural heritage, education, networking, quality and sustainable cross-border tourism and other related activities.

In December 2010, the Council of Europe`s Committee of Ministers adopted a resolution on the implementation of the expanded partial agreement on cultural roads (CEPOL). The purpose of this agreement was to facilitate the funding and organization of the program. The EPA is based within the EICR and regularly brings together representatives from some states who are more interested in the programme, empowered to certify new cultural routes and evaluate already certified routes. [11] On 23 October 1987, the Declaration of Santiago de Compostela set up the pilgrimage routes of Santiago de Compostela, Europe`s first cultural route. [9] From that date, the Council of Europe gradually introduced the certification of routes of cultural, social or historical interest, in order to bring European cultures and peoples closer together.